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How do I treat my dandruff when I have eczema? March 31, 2016 00:00

Are you noticing large slightly greasy white flakes on the dark clothing on your shoulders? Or have you recently tried turning your head upside and brushing your scalp with your fingers over black paper? You may have the common cosmetic problem of dandruff! It’s a harmless, non-contagious condition but can be unpleasant and embarrassing for the sufferer. If you also feel that intense itching and patches of flaky skin, then this is a form of eczema known as seborrheic eczema or seborrheic dermatitis.

Seborrheic dermatitis affects the scalp by targeting a specific fat found in sebum
(oil released in the scalp) known as oleic acid. This loss of sebum leads to the cells on the scalp losing their stickiness and flaking off. Additionally, it can affect the areas of the face and in and around the ears showing some mild pink patches or in some cases thick crusts of skin.

If you are looking for a convenient and effective treatment of seborrheic dermatitis than give Eczacol a go. This oral supplement (no messy creams to make your hair greasy) goes to the source of the problem and is proven to be an effective relief from these symptoms. For more information on Eczacol click here to head to the store.

Some general tips on managing your hair and scalp

  • Only wash your hair only when you need to. If it’s not greasy then leave it another day.
  • Avoid blow drying your hair – if your scalp is particularly irritated then leave it to dry out naturally. Hot air from hairdryers can really dry out your scalp and increase the problem.
  • Use gentle, natural shampoo or if you are prone to excess oil then wash your hair in products specifically formulated to treat dandruff and oily scalps. These pH neutral shampoos help restore your scalps acid-base balance. Shampoo your hair after sweating heavily as perspiration can be a trigger.
  • Stay away from sharp combs and brushes. Yes, the feeling of these brushes can be bliss for an itchy scalp but it does more damage in the long run. Use ones with smooth plastic and wide tines – it’s much kinder to the skin.

Also hats and headbands can make the scalp hot and sweaty and control the use of styling products as this can irritate the scalp on contact.

Dandruff itself usually clears with the correct hair and skin treatment but it can be a recurring problem. So be on the lookout for those flare-ups or pesky flakes re-appearing.

*Please remember to always seek medical advice. This article is written generically about eczema and should not supersede any advice received by a medical professional about an individual condition. If you think you have eczema, atopic dermatitis or any other condition get the advice of your Family Doctor especially before beginning or changing any course of medication.


Do I have eczema? February 29, 2016 12:34

‘This rash won’t go away.’ ‘My skin is very dry and sensitive.’ ‘I can’t stop scratching.’  These are very common complaints from sufferers of eczema, also known as atopic dermatitis.  Eczema can affect anyone, at any time in life, though mostly during infancy.  About 20% of babies have it and 1 in 10 adults have some type of eczema.  Often sufferers will have family members with the same condition or may suffer hay fever, asthma or other allergies.

What does it look like?

If you, or a loved one, have eczema it’s likely your skin will be red, dry and sensitive. Symptoms can range from very mild to severe.  You may suffer from the unpleasant and intense itching causing further inflammation on your skin. Other signs to look out for are:

  • Recurring rash
  • Scaly areas
  • Oozing and crusting of skin
  • Rough leathery patches
  • Dark coloured patches.

Symptoms of eczema are different for each person and can affect any part of your skin. Commonly it’s found in the bends of the elbows and knees, face, buttocks, hands, wrists and feet. But really it can appear anywhere.

Getting help

If you suspect you have this condition it is important to see your medical practitioner straightaway.  They can best diagnose eczema by examining the skin and looking at any family history. They may then refer you to a dermatologist or allergist for confirmation or treatment. If you would like some advice on the many treatments available speak to your local pharmacist about what is available or head to our online store to check out Eczacol and find out if it could help you.

What about my kids?

Signs of eczema in children usually appear as early as nine to twelve months of age, with some as early as 4 months. In babies eczema tends to show up on the cheeks and scalp first.  It may spread to the arms, legs, chest or other parts of the body.  Rash’s also commonly appear on: -

  • Inside of elbows and backs of knees
  • Wrists, and the ankles

Thankfully most children grow out of the condition before school age or adulthood. Remember though only your doctor can diagnose eczema correctly so if you are in any doubt check any unusual skin appearance with them.

 

*Please remember to always seek medical advice. This article is written generically about eczema and should not supersede any advice received by a medical professional about an individual condition. If you think you have eczema, atopic dermatitis or any other condition get the advice of your Family Doctor especially before beginning or changing any course of medication.


How do I spell Eczema? February 23, 2016 16:18

I don’t know about you but whenever I type in an uncommon word I rely on my wonderful computer to know what I’m talking about and do its job auto-correcting my spelling.  In my mind eczema should be spelt xcema or exzma! Other miss-spellings I have come across include eczima, ezema, exama, eximina oh I could go on. As I type I can see those red underlined words shouting at me! Who needs to spell the word correctly anyway when it is enough trouble managing the Simpsons sorry I mean symptoms.

The word eczema (got it right this time) has its origins from the Greek word ekzein.  This dates back all the way to 1753 and literally means “something thrown out by heat” ek – meaning out, zein - meaning boil. A name given from ancient practitioners to “any fiery pustule on the skin.”  To them they are creating a word from the appearance of boiling skin. Sounds lovely eh? So it goes from ekzein to ekzema to eczema (pronounced EK-zeh-ma). 

So how about atopic dermatitis, it sounds a bit more clinical.  Atopy comes from the word allergy and dermatitis meaning skin inflammation. This could seem like another fancy word for dry skin.

If, like me, you were curious about other versions of the same word check out these beautiful translations; perhaps Thai: โรคเรื้อนกวาง or even in hindi खुजली? I think it looks far more impressive or elegant than having the condition feels.

Whatever the spelling or term you give it, if you’re an eczema sufferer have a look at our tried and tested product Eczacol for effective relief from the symptoms of eczema.

 

*Please remember to always seek medical advice. This article is written generically about eczema and should not supersede any advice received by a medical professional about an individual condition. If you think you have eczema, atopic dermatitis or any other condition get the advice of your Family Doctor especially before beginning or changing any course of medication.


What are the symptoms of eczema? December 16, 2015 12:00

Eczema is inflammation of the skin also known as Atopic dermatitis - a very common condition. It comes from the Greek word for bubbling and can be found in children as early 2 or 3 months old though to adults. There are many ways eczema can show itself such as; itching & redness and more severe cases that can cause skin to blister, weep or peel.

Symptoms

Generally people with eczema suffer from dry sensitive skin. Symptoms vary with each case from a mild rash that can disappear quickly, dry skin to red intense itchiness, which can be so bad that you scratch your skin until it bleeds. This of course makes the rash worse - known as the itch-scratch cycle or as medical professionals call it “the itch that rashes”

Itching – one of the most unpleasant things! - The urge to scratch, which causes more rawness and sometimes infections to the skin. The medical term for this is Pruritus (proo-RYE-tuss) these are itching sensations carried by peripheral sensory nerves. You can find more information on this from WebMD here Itching can feel worse at night and can be especially upsetting for children who suffer. Anything that dry’s the skin out can lead to this irritation.

Rashes – inflamed skin usually appears after scratching and can look red and bumpy. On children this commonly appears in the creases of the elbows or knees. Other places are neck, wrists, ankles and/or between the buttocks and legs. With adults the rash can be located just about anywhere.

Unusual skin appearance - Skin can develop a grainy look caused by tiny fluid blisters just under the skin called “vesicles”. Crusts or scabs can form when the fluid of the skin dries out. Lots of rubbing and overuse of steroid creams can produce leathery thicker plaques of skin.

If you are looking for effective relief from these symptoms try ECZACOL today and in as little as 6 weeks you can experience a dramatic reduction in these symptoms. Head to our online store to order now.

*Please remember to always seek medical advice. This article is written generically about eczema and should not supersede any advice received by a medical professional about an individual condition. If you think you have eczema, atopic dermatitis or any other condition get the advice of your Family Doctor especially before beginning or changing any course of medication.

 


What does IBS mean? December 07, 2015 09:30

“Abdominal pain and changes in the bowel that last for at least 3 days a month for a period of 3 months or more.”

Irritable Bowel Syndrome affects the bowels, specifically the large intestine. The exact cause of IBS is currently unknown although research is underway into genetic and environmental factors that may be contributing factors.

IBS is a chronic condition (long-term) that currently has no cure. There are a wide range of medications, supplements and techniques to help treat the symptoms of IBS.

Symptoms can vary between sufferers, some identify as having mild symptoms and discomfort while others suffer from a significantly reduced quality of life. Some people experience constipation and others diarrhoea or a combination of both.

Irritable Bowel Syndrome is different to Inflammatory Bowel Disorders such as Crohn’s disease and Ulcerative colitis and it is important to seek the correct medical diagnosis as treatment will vary based on your results.

IBS affects roughly 10% of the global population and can affect any one although it is found to be more prevalent in different ages, genders, countries and other factors.

To find out more about IBS check out our other articles. Or if you have IBS and are looking for relief from your symptoms check out IBSACOL in our shop. By taking IBSACOL you could be completely symptom free in as little as 6 weeks.

*Please remember to always seek medical advice. This article is written generically about IBS and should not supersede any advice received by a medical professional about an individual condition. If you think you have IBS or any other condition get the advice of your Family Doctor especially before beginning or changing any course of medication.


What are IBS spasms and cramps? November 25, 2015 10:00

Sufferers have described irritable bowel syndrome spasms and cramps as:

  • Discomfort
  • Abdominal pain
  • A sharp stabbing
  • A ‘migraine’ in the stomach

Unfortunately one of the most unpleasant symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome is pain. This pain can be caused by intestinal spasms or cramps that can lead to decreased or increased movement in the bowels and a feeling of constipation, gassiness or bloating.

“A cramp or spasm is a sudden or prolonged involuntary muscular contraction or convulsive movement” – as defined in the Oxford dictionary.

When the pain is new
Spasms and cramps can be painful and alarming. When diagnosing IBS your doctor will ask you about the types of pain you have experienced. If you are experiencing a different pain to your typical symptoms and you have concerns we recommend that you speak to your doctor immediately.

Ongoing effects
IBS flare ups can be linked to stress and anxiety. Help yourself break the pain-stress-symptom cycle by making sure you manage your pain with a plan outlined with an IBS specialist or your GP so that this doesn’t lead to increased stress and flare up’s of your condition.

There are many methods considered helpful for alleviating pain, if you would like to try IBSACOL and see how it could relieve your symptoms check out our 2 month supply option.

Your doctor may also suggest:

  • Hot water bottles or wheat bags
  • Peppermint oil
  • Medications and pain relief prescribed by your doctor
  • Exercise
  • Stress relieving practices
  • Hydration

*If you have IBS and are experiencing unusual pain unlike pain you have already described to your doctor please seek medical advice immediately. This article is written generically about IBS and should not supersede any advice received by a medical professional about an individual condition. If you think you have IBS or any other condition get the advice of your Family Doctor especially before beginning or changing any course of medication.


What are IBS flare ups? November 18, 2015 10:00

For some Irritable Bowel Sufferers symptoms can come and go. A ‘flare up’ is when symptoms are aggravated. You may have found that you can experience symptom free weeks followed by one of these flare ups, sometimes it will be obvious what has triggered this and sometimes it can be harder to tell. Below is some information on flare ups that we hope will be helpful to you.

Causes

Flare up’s can be caused by many factors, some include; diet, stress, anxiety, a lack of exercise, incorrect digestion from eating too quickly and chewing gum.

Treating

As with all treatment of Irritable Bowel Syndrome you may be advised to consider

  • Medication and supplements
  • Dietary changes
  • Lifestyle changes and stress management

Moving forward

After a flare up the digestive tract may continue to be sensitive for a time. It is important to keep that in mind to avoid returning to a flared up state. Try to keep up your techniques for treating a flare up for a time and not make any dramatic changes, remember also that if you are making a change in your diet in response to a flare up you may need to give it some time to be fully effective.

Would you like to find out about how IBSACOL could help you prevent flare ups? It can bring you symptomatic relief by modulating the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 found naturally in the body to improve the immune system response to inflammation? Try it today from our IBSACOL products page.

*Please remember to always seek medical advice. This article is written generically about IBS and should not supersede any advice received by a medical professional about an individual condition. If you think you have IBS or any other condition get the advice of your Family Doctor especially before beginning or changing any course of medication.

 

 


What are IBS trigger foods November 11, 2015 10:00

What is a trigger food?

An Irritable Bowel Syndrome ‘trigger food’ is one that can initiate or aggravate IBS symptoms including change in bowel movements, cramps and bloating. Some of these foods are widely known for their effect on sufferers where others do not always set off a reaction but in some instances do.

What foods are included?

Foods known to produce excess gas within the bowels – these can aggravate bloating and feelings of urgency. 
(Beans, cabbage, legumes, cauliflower, broccoli, lentils, sprouts, raisins, onions, bagels, soft drinks and soda etc.)

Foods that stimulate the gut – these can cause cramping and bloating.
(High fat meals, large portion sizes, fried foods, alcohol and caffeine)

Hard to digest sugars – these can cause cramping and diarrhoea.
(Sorbitol sweetener found in some sugar free food and soft drinks and fructose)

What alternatives are there?

It is important to remember that although these food’s may trigger IBS symptoms if you do decide to remove them from your diet you will still need to find a source of the vital vitamins and minerals your body requires.

  • Consider speaking to a dietician about developing a meal plan tailored to your symptoms.
  • There are many diet plans available online, the majority of them have good ideas on how to eat well with IBS.
  • Experiment with different foods, try eliminating different foods from your diet to see if that makes a difference to your symptoms.

Looking to be free of restricted diets? Try IBSACOL today and see if after just a few weeks you can go back to eating the foods you miss. Here are some testimonials from people who have found that IBSACOL helped them.

Thank you to the International Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders for providing information on this topic.

*A healthy diet is vital for everyone. Please remember to always seek medical advice. This article is written generically about IBS and should not supersede any advice received by a medical professional about an individual condition. If you think you have IBS or any other condition get the advice of your Family Doctor especially before beginning or changing any course of medication.

 

 

 


What are IBS symptoms? November 04, 2015 10:00

Irritable Bowel Syndrome is characterised most simply by abdominal pain and changes in the bowel that last for at least 3 days a month for a period of 3 months or more.

Symptoms can vary from person to person but common signs will include:

  • Abdominal pain
  • Gas
  • Feeling of fullness
  • Bloating

Other symptoms that may be experienced are:

  • Appetite loss
  • Mucus in stools
  • Change in consistency or appearance of stools

Although IBS is a gastric condition some symptoms may not be directly linked to the intestines

  • Anxiety or depression
  • Fatigue
  • Headaches
  • An unpleasant taste in the mouth
  • Backache
  • Sleep problems (insomnia)
  • Sexual problems, such as pain during sex or reduced sexual desire
  • Heart palpitations
  • Urinary symptoms (Including frequent or urgent need to urinate, trouble starting the urine stream, or trouble emptying bladder)

Bowels
Bowel changes can present in two very different ways. Some IBS sufferers will experience diarrhoea, others constipation and in some cases a person may experience an alternation between diarrhoea and constipation. Typically pain will be relieved following a bowel movement.

What do you do if you identify with these symptoms?

Firstly it is important to remember that there are many other medical conditions that share these symptoms; that is why if you have the symptoms mentioned above you should seek medical advice. 

If you already have been diagnosed with IBS and are wanting to know more about this condition please check out our other posts or learn more about what IBSACOL can do for you here.

Thanks to the U.S. National Library of Medicine and the Mayo Clinic for information that has contributed to this article.

*Please remember to always seek medical advice. This article is written generically about IBS and should not supersede any advice received by a medical professional about an individual condition. If you think you have IBS or any other condition get the advice of your Family Doctor especially before beginning or changing any course of medication.