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Can I make my eczema better with diet? April 06, 2016 00:00

Well it’s a good question! A healthy diet and good proper nutrition is important to our general wellbeing whether we have eczema or not. Some people report that they have been able to eliminate eczema by significantly changing food choices. So it is definitely worth considering what you eat to find out if certain foods are potential triggers for you.

Food Triggers

Linking the eating of certain foods with eczema symptoms is an individual thing. Common foods that can potentially cause a flare-up are dairy (especially cow’s milk and egg), soy, nuts, wheat and shellfish. These food groups alone cause 90% of all food allergies.
Some of the more acidic fruits – strawberries, tomatoes, oranges and lemons can also set off a skin reaction in eczema sufferers. If you think you may be allergic to a particular food its best to talk to your doctor. Testing may then be recommended to diagnose any specific allergies.

Food additives and preservatives found in pre-packaged and processed food can also trigger or worsen the eczema. Look on the labels for ingredients like tartrazine (E102), sodium benzoate, fruit preservatives and monosodium glutamate (MSG).

Elimination diets

Some people find it beneficial to avoid certain food types to relieve the eczema. Known as an “elimination diet’ or exclusion diet’. This does take some time - it’s a process of finding out what could be the trigger by removing specific foods or ingredients from your diet. Over time you can then start introducing the suspect food to see if there are any changes.

Treating and eating away the eczema!

Choosing a healthy diet with plenty of fruits, vegetables, whole grains and low-fat dairy is certainly the right path. You may also want to include taking Eczacol as an effective and safe supplement.

Avoiding processed food, alcohol, refined carbohydrates and sugars will almost certainly make a difference. Foods high in Omega-3 fatty acids found in fish and fish oil will help fight any inflammation. Vitamins A and B found in green leafy vegetables, carrots, squash and sweet potato’s is also recommended. Make sure you’re well hydrated too by drinking plenty of water, at least 1.5 litres – our bodies need it.

So there you have it – According to many it is very much possible to eat your way out of the eczema symptoms and improve your health and wellbeing at the same time. Win Win!

If you have tried diet changes but are still suffering from the uncomfortable symptoms of eczema why not try ECZACOL, a natural medical supplement that has been shown to relieve symptoms of eczema in just 6 weeks.

*Please remember to always seek medical advice. This article is written generically about eczema and should not supersede any advice received by a medical professional about an individual condition. If you think you have eczema, atopic dermatitis or any other condition get the advice of your Family Doctor especially before beginning or changing any course of medication.


Why might IBS cause nausea January 12, 2016 10:30

Nausea is a common symptom for sufferers of IBS but why does it happen and what can you do about it? Nausea relating to IBS can be caused by a number of the issues associated with Irritable Bowel Syndrome and has been shown to affect 3 or 4 in 10 IBS sufferers.

Causes include:

Bloating – the increased gasses and full feeling can leave a sufferer feeling pressure in their stomach that can trigger nausea.

Constipation – Sufferers of constipation related to IBS may feel nausea because of a similar feeling of pressure in the stomach that bloating can cause. Dehydration related to constipation may also cause a feeling of nausea.

Heartburn –Activities in the stomach may cause a sufferer to feel nausea triggered by the reflux action.

Diet changes – The addition of a ‘trigger food’* to the diet may cause the stomach to react and this irritation may cause a sufferer to experience a feeling of nausea.

Nausea Relief:

Treatment of nausea in these cases is a combination of symptomatic relief and identifying and treating the causes.

IBSACOL is designed to relieve the symptoms of IBS by naturally modulating the intestines inflammatory response. If you would like to try IBSACOL and see how it can relieve your symptoms, including nausea, why don’t you try our two month starter option?

Speak to your doctor about finding relief and treatment specific to your own case. Some common ways to relieve the nausea include:

  • Peppermint oil
  • Wheat bags or heat/ cool compress (depending on presence of chill or fever)
  • Hydration
  • Eating small amounts of ginger
  • Acupressure and acupuncture
  • If you suffer from prolonged nausea your doctor may prescribe an anti-nausea medication although this is only in extreme cases where natural solutions are not effective.

 *To find out more about Trigger Food’s check out our article on them here.

**Please remember to always seek medical advice. This article is written generically about IBS and should not supersede any advice received by a medical professional about an individual condition. If you think you have IBS or any other condition get the advice of your Family Doctor especially before beginning or changing any course of medication.


Why might IBS cause tiredness and fatigue? January 06, 2016 14:30

In addition to pain and bowel changes there are many symptoms associated with IBS that sufferers experience with varying intensity. Many sufferers of IBS report fatigue, there are a number of causes of this tiredness.

It is important to remember that although there is a lot of information available about IBS much of this condition is not fully understood. Until the specific cause of IBS is known and a cure found solutions will be focused on reliving these symptoms.

Dehydration and Nutrient Loss: Anyone suffering from diarrhoea loses vital water and nutrients, to combat this ensure you are replacing those lost fluids and eating foods that will replace any lost nutrients to the body. Those suffering from constipation can also feel a lethargy, again ensure that you are taking in enough fluids.

Stress Related: Also known as Brain Fog. Stress is known to have a direct link to IBS, you may have reached mental exhaustion and are wondering why? When a body experiences stress it is responding to its natural ‘fight or flight’ mechanism where adrenaline releases and has a knock on effect physically on your heart rate, muscle tension and blood flow. Unless this stress cycle is countered your body will continue to ‘fight’ until it is exhausted. Try focusing on stress relief techniques and introducing more gentle exercise to help break the cycle.

Pain Related: If you have been suffering pain because of IBS or any other cause your body will have a similar response to stress where it will begin to ‘fight’. Pain itself can lead to stress or depression which can further magnify this response. Seeking out effective pain relieving solutions and practicing stress relieving techniques should eliminate the cause of this fatigue.

Medication Related: In order to treat Irritable Bowel Syndrome you will probably be advised to take certain medications or supplements to relieve your symptoms. Some of these medications may have fatigue or tiredness as a side effect. It is important that you speak with your family doctor if these side effects become severe or unusual.

Sleep Disruption: During flare ups of symptoms diarrhoea may cause sufferers to make several trips to the bathroom day and night. Constipation may keep a person awake with both pain and discomfort. Where possible try to find extra time to sleep or rest knowing that you are going to be unsettled. Remember that once the bowel related symptoms are back under control this will finish as well.

If you are interested in finding out how IBSACOL could bring you relief from your IBS symptoms check out or products here. Or go to our testimonials page to hear what other customers have said about us. Fatigue is not a known side effect of taking IBSACOL.

*Please remember to always seek medical advice. This article is written generically about IBS and should not supersede any advice received by a medical professional about an individual condition. If you think you have IBS or any other condition get the advice of your Family Doctor especially before beginning or changing any course of medication.


 


What are the symptoms of eczema? December 16, 2015 12:00

Eczema is inflammation of the skin also known as Atopic dermatitis - a very common condition. It comes from the Greek word for bubbling and can be found in children as early 2 or 3 months old though to adults. There are many ways eczema can show itself such as; itching & redness and more severe cases that can cause skin to blister, weep or peel.

Symptoms

Generally people with eczema suffer from dry sensitive skin. Symptoms vary with each case from a mild rash that can disappear quickly, dry skin to red intense itchiness, which can be so bad that you scratch your skin until it bleeds. This of course makes the rash worse - known as the itch-scratch cycle or as medical professionals call it “the itch that rashes”

Itching – one of the most unpleasant things! - The urge to scratch, which causes more rawness and sometimes infections to the skin. The medical term for this is Pruritus (proo-RYE-tuss) these are itching sensations carried by peripheral sensory nerves. You can find more information on this from WebMD here Itching can feel worse at night and can be especially upsetting for children who suffer. Anything that dry’s the skin out can lead to this irritation.

Rashes – inflamed skin usually appears after scratching and can look red and bumpy. On children this commonly appears in the creases of the elbows or knees. Other places are neck, wrists, ankles and/or between the buttocks and legs. With adults the rash can be located just about anywhere.

Unusual skin appearance - Skin can develop a grainy look caused by tiny fluid blisters just under the skin called “vesicles”. Crusts or scabs can form when the fluid of the skin dries out. Lots of rubbing and overuse of steroid creams can produce leathery thicker plaques of skin.

If you are looking for effective relief from these symptoms try ECZACOL today and in as little as 6 weeks you can experience a dramatic reduction in these symptoms. Head to our online store to order now.

*Please remember to always seek medical advice. This article is written generically about eczema and should not supersede any advice received by a medical professional about an individual condition. If you think you have eczema, atopic dermatitis or any other condition get the advice of your Family Doctor especially before beginning or changing any course of medication.

 


What does IBS mean? December 07, 2015 09:30

“Abdominal pain and changes in the bowel that last for at least 3 days a month for a period of 3 months or more.”

Irritable Bowel Syndrome affects the bowels, specifically the large intestine. The exact cause of IBS is currently unknown although research is underway into genetic and environmental factors that may be contributing factors.

IBS is a chronic condition (long-term) that currently has no cure. There are a wide range of medications, supplements and techniques to help treat the symptoms of IBS.

Symptoms can vary between sufferers, some identify as having mild symptoms and discomfort while others suffer from a significantly reduced quality of life. Some people experience constipation and others diarrhoea or a combination of both.

Irritable Bowel Syndrome is different to Inflammatory Bowel Disorders such as Crohn’s disease and Ulcerative colitis and it is important to seek the correct medical diagnosis as treatment will vary based on your results.

IBS affects roughly 10% of the global population and can affect any one although it is found to be more prevalent in different ages, genders, countries and other factors.

To find out more about IBS check out our other articles. Or if you have IBS and are looking for relief from your symptoms check out IBSACOL in our shop. By taking IBSACOL you could be completely symptom free in as little as 6 weeks.

*Please remember to always seek medical advice. This article is written generically about IBS and should not supersede any advice received by a medical professional about an individual condition. If you think you have IBS or any other condition get the advice of your Family Doctor especially before beginning or changing any course of medication.


What are IBS spasms and cramps? November 25, 2015 10:00

Sufferers have described irritable bowel syndrome spasms and cramps as:

  • Discomfort
  • Abdominal pain
  • A sharp stabbing
  • A ‘migraine’ in the stomach

Unfortunately one of the most unpleasant symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome is pain. This pain can be caused by intestinal spasms or cramps that can lead to decreased or increased movement in the bowels and a feeling of constipation, gassiness or bloating.

“A cramp or spasm is a sudden or prolonged involuntary muscular contraction or convulsive movement” – as defined in the Oxford dictionary.

When the pain is new
Spasms and cramps can be painful and alarming. When diagnosing IBS your doctor will ask you about the types of pain you have experienced. If you are experiencing a different pain to your typical symptoms and you have concerns we recommend that you speak to your doctor immediately.

Ongoing effects
IBS flare ups can be linked to stress and anxiety. Help yourself break the pain-stress-symptom cycle by making sure you manage your pain with a plan outlined with an IBS specialist or your GP so that this doesn’t lead to increased stress and flare up’s of your condition.

There are many methods considered helpful for alleviating pain, if you would like to try IBSACOL and see how it could relieve your symptoms check out our 2 month supply option.

Your doctor may also suggest:

  • Hot water bottles or wheat bags
  • Peppermint oil
  • Medications and pain relief prescribed by your doctor
  • Exercise
  • Stress relieving practices
  • Hydration

*If you have IBS and are experiencing unusual pain unlike pain you have already described to your doctor please seek medical advice immediately. This article is written generically about IBS and should not supersede any advice received by a medical professional about an individual condition. If you think you have IBS or any other condition get the advice of your Family Doctor especially before beginning or changing any course of medication.


What are IBS symptoms? November 04, 2015 10:00

Irritable Bowel Syndrome is characterised most simply by abdominal pain and changes in the bowel that last for at least 3 days a month for a period of 3 months or more.

Symptoms can vary from person to person but common signs will include:

  • Abdominal pain
  • Gas
  • Feeling of fullness
  • Bloating

Other symptoms that may be experienced are:

  • Appetite loss
  • Mucus in stools
  • Change in consistency or appearance of stools

Although IBS is a gastric condition some symptoms may not be directly linked to the intestines

  • Anxiety or depression
  • Fatigue
  • Headaches
  • An unpleasant taste in the mouth
  • Backache
  • Sleep problems (insomnia)
  • Sexual problems, such as pain during sex or reduced sexual desire
  • Heart palpitations
  • Urinary symptoms (Including frequent or urgent need to urinate, trouble starting the urine stream, or trouble emptying bladder)

Bowels
Bowel changes can present in two very different ways. Some IBS sufferers will experience diarrhoea, others constipation and in some cases a person may experience an alternation between diarrhoea and constipation. Typically pain will be relieved following a bowel movement.

What do you do if you identify with these symptoms?

Firstly it is important to remember that there are many other medical conditions that share these symptoms; that is why if you have the symptoms mentioned above you should seek medical advice. 

If you already have been diagnosed with IBS and are wanting to know more about this condition please check out our other posts or learn more about what IBSACOL can do for you here.

Thanks to the U.S. National Library of Medicine and the Mayo Clinic for information that has contributed to this article.

*Please remember to always seek medical advice. This article is written generically about IBS and should not supersede any advice received by a medical professional about an individual condition. If you think you have IBS or any other condition get the advice of your Family Doctor especially before beginning or changing any course of medication.