News

Why might IBS cause nausea January 12, 2016 10:30

Nausea is a common symptom for sufferers of IBS but why does it happen and what can you do about it? Nausea relating to IBS can be caused by a number of the issues associated with Irritable Bowel Syndrome and has been shown to affect 3 or 4 in 10 IBS sufferers.

Causes include:

Bloating – the increased gasses and full feeling can leave a sufferer feeling pressure in their stomach that can trigger nausea.

Constipation – Sufferers of constipation related to IBS may feel nausea because of a similar feeling of pressure in the stomach that bloating can cause. Dehydration related to constipation may also cause a feeling of nausea.

Heartburn –Activities in the stomach may cause a sufferer to feel nausea triggered by the reflux action.

Diet changes – The addition of a ‘trigger food’* to the diet may cause the stomach to react and this irritation may cause a sufferer to experience a feeling of nausea.

Nausea Relief:

Treatment of nausea in these cases is a combination of symptomatic relief and identifying and treating the causes.

IBSACOL is designed to relieve the symptoms of IBS by naturally modulating the intestines inflammatory response. If you would like to try IBSACOL and see how it can relieve your symptoms, including nausea, why don’t you try our two month starter option?

Speak to your doctor about finding relief and treatment specific to your own case. Some common ways to relieve the nausea include:

  • Peppermint oil
  • Wheat bags or heat/ cool compress (depending on presence of chill or fever)
  • Hydration
  • Eating small amounts of ginger
  • Acupressure and acupuncture
  • If you suffer from prolonged nausea your doctor may prescribe an anti-nausea medication although this is only in extreme cases where natural solutions are not effective.

 *To find out more about Trigger Food’s check out our article on them here.

**Please remember to always seek medical advice. This article is written generically about IBS and should not supersede any advice received by a medical professional about an individual condition. If you think you have IBS or any other condition get the advice of your Family Doctor especially before beginning or changing any course of medication.


Why might IBS cause tiredness and fatigue? January 06, 2016 14:30

In addition to pain and bowel changes there are many symptoms associated with IBS that sufferers experience with varying intensity. Many sufferers of IBS report fatigue, there are a number of causes of this tiredness.

It is important to remember that although there is a lot of information available about IBS much of this condition is not fully understood. Until the specific cause of IBS is known and a cure found solutions will be focused on reliving these symptoms.

Dehydration and Nutrient Loss: Anyone suffering from diarrhoea loses vital water and nutrients, to combat this ensure you are replacing those lost fluids and eating foods that will replace any lost nutrients to the body. Those suffering from constipation can also feel a lethargy, again ensure that you are taking in enough fluids.

Stress Related: Also known as Brain Fog. Stress is known to have a direct link to IBS, you may have reached mental exhaustion and are wondering why? When a body experiences stress it is responding to its natural ‘fight or flight’ mechanism where adrenaline releases and has a knock on effect physically on your heart rate, muscle tension and blood flow. Unless this stress cycle is countered your body will continue to ‘fight’ until it is exhausted. Try focusing on stress relief techniques and introducing more gentle exercise to help break the cycle.

Pain Related: If you have been suffering pain because of IBS or any other cause your body will have a similar response to stress where it will begin to ‘fight’. Pain itself can lead to stress or depression which can further magnify this response. Seeking out effective pain relieving solutions and practicing stress relieving techniques should eliminate the cause of this fatigue.

Medication Related: In order to treat Irritable Bowel Syndrome you will probably be advised to take certain medications or supplements to relieve your symptoms. Some of these medications may have fatigue or tiredness as a side effect. It is important that you speak with your family doctor if these side effects become severe or unusual.

Sleep Disruption: During flare ups of symptoms diarrhoea may cause sufferers to make several trips to the bathroom day and night. Constipation may keep a person awake with both pain and discomfort. Where possible try to find extra time to sleep or rest knowing that you are going to be unsettled. Remember that once the bowel related symptoms are back under control this will finish as well.

If you are interested in finding out how IBSACOL could bring you relief from your IBS symptoms check out or products here. Or go to our testimonials page to hear what other customers have said about us. Fatigue is not a known side effect of taking IBSACOL.

*Please remember to always seek medical advice. This article is written generically about IBS and should not supersede any advice received by a medical professional about an individual condition. If you think you have IBS or any other condition get the advice of your Family Doctor especially before beginning or changing any course of medication.


 


Who can treat Irritable Bowel Syndrome? December 21, 2015 08:00

To have arrived at this page we will assume that you are currently researching Irritable Bowel Syndrome to ensure that you are as informed as you can be to either help yourself or a loved one with this condition. Since 1978 it has been possible to make an accurate medical diagnosis of Irritable Bowel Syndrome. These days your local family doctor will have been trained in identifying IBS and distinguishing it from other gastrointestinal conditions.

If you think you may suffer from Irritable Bowel Syndrome and have not had a diagnosis please speak to your doctor right away.

At the moment no cure has been discovered for IBS but once a diagnosis has been made your doctor can offer a variety of solutions in the treatment of Irritable Bowel Syndrome. They may also refer to you a gastroenterologist or another medical specialist. You may wish to speak to your local pharmacist for advice on the many non-prescription medications available. When considering what medications and supplements you should be taking make sure to check out IBSACOL, a product we have created to provide symptomatic relief from Irritable Bowel Syndrome.

Irritable Bowel Syndrome is chronic (long-lasting) condition and it is important that you look to manage symptoms that may otherwise negatively impact on your quality of life. Some of the changes you will make will not include medication and you may wish to speak to a nutritionist or a personal trainer to help you make lifestyle adjustments.

As I mentioned at the start you are also able to inform yourself using resources from local medical facilities or online resources. Perhaps it will be helpful to take some time to read through some of the other articles on this site to inform yourself about different aspects of Irritable Bowel Syndrome. We have nearly 2 decades of experience with developing a solution for IBS so we thought we would share some of what we have learned with you.

Finally, a problem shared is a problem halved. Make sure you don’t suffer alone, perhaps check out some excellent forums and sites where people going through similar things can share their stories and ask questions. We particularly recommend: www.ibsgroup.org

*Please remember to always seek medical advice. This article is written generically about IBS and should not supersede any advice received by a medical professional about an individual condition. If you think you have IBS or any other condition get the advice of your Family Doctor especially before beginning or changing any course of medication.


What does IBS mean? December 07, 2015 09:30

“Abdominal pain and changes in the bowel that last for at least 3 days a month for a period of 3 months or more.”

Irritable Bowel Syndrome affects the bowels, specifically the large intestine. The exact cause of IBS is currently unknown although research is underway into genetic and environmental factors that may be contributing factors.

IBS is a chronic condition (long-term) that currently has no cure. There are a wide range of medications, supplements and techniques to help treat the symptoms of IBS.

Symptoms can vary between sufferers, some identify as having mild symptoms and discomfort while others suffer from a significantly reduced quality of life. Some people experience constipation and others diarrhoea or a combination of both.

Irritable Bowel Syndrome is different to Inflammatory Bowel Disorders such as Crohn’s disease and Ulcerative colitis and it is important to seek the correct medical diagnosis as treatment will vary based on your results.

IBS affects roughly 10% of the global population and can affect any one although it is found to be more prevalent in different ages, genders, countries and other factors.

To find out more about IBS check out our other articles. Or if you have IBS and are looking for relief from your symptoms check out IBSACOL in our shop. By taking IBSACOL you could be completely symptom free in as little as 6 weeks.

*Please remember to always seek medical advice. This article is written generically about IBS and should not supersede any advice received by a medical professional about an individual condition. If you think you have IBS or any other condition get the advice of your Family Doctor especially before beginning or changing any course of medication.


What are the Rome Criteria? November 30, 2015 10:00

A Family Doctor or IBS specialist will diagnose a patient’s symptoms based on standard criteria for distinguishing between different gastrointestinal disorders. In some countries this is referred to as the Rome Criteria**.

Here is what the Rome Criteria define Irritable Bowel Syndrome as:

“Recurrent abdominal pain or discomfort at least 3 days/month in the last 3 months associated with two or more of the following:

  1. Improvement with defecation
  2. Onset associated with a change in frequency of stool
  3. Onset associated with a change in form (appearance) of stool

Criterion fulfilled for the last 3 months with symptom onset at least 6 months prior to diagnosis “Discomfort” means an uncomfortable sensation not described as pain.”

If you have been diagnosed with Irritable Bowel Syndrome and are looking for a solution to provide relief for your symptoms try IBSACOL you can find out more about IBSACOL and our products here.

*Please remember to always seek medical advice. This article is written generically about IBS and should not supersede any advice received by a medical professional about an individual condition. If you think you have IBS or any other condition get the advice of your Family Doctor especially before beginning or changing any course of medication.

**To find out more about a scale of severity for Irritable Bowel Syndrome please check out our other article on the topic.


What are IBS spasms and cramps? November 25, 2015 10:00

Sufferers have described irritable bowel syndrome spasms and cramps as:

  • Discomfort
  • Abdominal pain
  • A sharp stabbing
  • A ‘migraine’ in the stomach

Unfortunately one of the most unpleasant symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome is pain. This pain can be caused by intestinal spasms or cramps that can lead to decreased or increased movement in the bowels and a feeling of constipation, gassiness or bloating.

“A cramp or spasm is a sudden or prolonged involuntary muscular contraction or convulsive movement” – as defined in the Oxford dictionary.

When the pain is new
Spasms and cramps can be painful and alarming. When diagnosing IBS your doctor will ask you about the types of pain you have experienced. If you are experiencing a different pain to your typical symptoms and you have concerns we recommend that you speak to your doctor immediately.

Ongoing effects
IBS flare ups can be linked to stress and anxiety. Help yourself break the pain-stress-symptom cycle by making sure you manage your pain with a plan outlined with an IBS specialist or your GP so that this doesn’t lead to increased stress and flare up’s of your condition.

There are many methods considered helpful for alleviating pain, if you would like to try IBSACOL and see how it could relieve your symptoms check out our 2 month supply option.

Your doctor may also suggest:

  • Hot water bottles or wheat bags
  • Peppermint oil
  • Medications and pain relief prescribed by your doctor
  • Exercise
  • Stress relieving practices
  • Hydration

*If you have IBS and are experiencing unusual pain unlike pain you have already described to your doctor please seek medical advice immediately. This article is written generically about IBS and should not supersede any advice received by a medical professional about an individual condition. If you think you have IBS or any other condition get the advice of your Family Doctor especially before beginning or changing any course of medication.


Understanding levels of severity in Irritable Bowel Syndrome? November 23, 2015 11:00

Is there a scale of symptoms?

Many studies have identified a range, or scale, within IBS to distinguish appropriate treatment paths. Some refer to these levels as;

Mild – Moderate – Severe

Others have gone into further detail. One of the most helpful ones we have come across considers the impact on quality of life:

1-none: no symptoms
2-mild: can be ignored if you do not think about it
3-moderate: cannot be ignored but does not affect your lifestyle
4-severe: affects your lifestyle
5-very severe: markedly affects your lifestyle

*This 5 point scale comes from research by Joel Sach

In any case of Irritable Bowel Syndrome a variety of symptoms can occur. Beyond the key criteria causes have been identified as environmental, genetic, functional, psychological and more. It is important to be aware of these causes and symptoms but not all sufferers will show the same symptoms or have exactly the same cause.

Here are the Key Criteria:

Recurrent abdominal pain or discomfort at least 3 days/month in the last 3 months associated with two or more of the following:

  1. Improvement with defecation
  2. Onset associated with a change in frequency of stool
  3. Onset associated with a change in form (appearance) of stool

Here is a very helpful table outlining what some researchers advise should signify a mild, moderate or severe level of the condition:

Taken from “Severity in Irritable Bowel Syndrome: A Rome Foundation Working Team Report – Drossman et al

*If you suffer from Irritable Bowel Syndrome and you are wondering what to do with any new information you are gathering, we recommend the first thing you do is to speak to your doctor. The information on this site is designed to help inform you and bring reassurance. If you would like to know more keep reading our information and research pages otherwise if you would like to find out how we can help you find relief from the symptoms of IBS why don’t you check out our IBSACOL products.


What are IBS flare ups? November 18, 2015 10:00

For some Irritable Bowel Sufferers symptoms can come and go. A ‘flare up’ is when symptoms are aggravated. You may have found that you can experience symptom free weeks followed by one of these flare ups, sometimes it will be obvious what has triggered this and sometimes it can be harder to tell. Below is some information on flare ups that we hope will be helpful to you.

Causes

Flare up’s can be caused by many factors, some include; diet, stress, anxiety, a lack of exercise, incorrect digestion from eating too quickly and chewing gum.

Treating

As with all treatment of Irritable Bowel Syndrome you may be advised to consider

  • Medication and supplements
  • Dietary changes
  • Lifestyle changes and stress management

Moving forward

After a flare up the digestive tract may continue to be sensitive for a time. It is important to keep that in mind to avoid returning to a flared up state. Try to keep up your techniques for treating a flare up for a time and not make any dramatic changes, remember also that if you are making a change in your diet in response to a flare up you may need to give it some time to be fully effective.

Would you like to find out about how IBSACOL could help you prevent flare ups? It can bring you symptomatic relief by modulating the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 found naturally in the body to improve the immune system response to inflammation? Try it today from our IBSACOL products page.

*Please remember to always seek medical advice. This article is written generically about IBS and should not supersede any advice received by a medical professional about an individual condition. If you think you have IBS or any other condition get the advice of your Family Doctor especially before beginning or changing any course of medication.

 

 


What are IBS trigger foods November 11, 2015 10:00

What is a trigger food?

An Irritable Bowel Syndrome ‘trigger food’ is one that can initiate or aggravate IBS symptoms including change in bowel movements, cramps and bloating. Some of these foods are widely known for their effect on sufferers where others do not always set off a reaction but in some instances do.

What foods are included?

Foods known to produce excess gas within the bowels – these can aggravate bloating and feelings of urgency. 
(Beans, cabbage, legumes, cauliflower, broccoli, lentils, sprouts, raisins, onions, bagels, soft drinks and soda etc.)

Foods that stimulate the gut – these can cause cramping and bloating.
(High fat meals, large portion sizes, fried foods, alcohol and caffeine)

Hard to digest sugars – these can cause cramping and diarrhoea.
(Sorbitol sweetener found in some sugar free food and soft drinks and fructose)

What alternatives are there?

It is important to remember that although these food’s may trigger IBS symptoms if you do decide to remove them from your diet you will still need to find a source of the vital vitamins and minerals your body requires.

  • Consider speaking to a dietician about developing a meal plan tailored to your symptoms.
  • There are many diet plans available online, the majority of them have good ideas on how to eat well with IBS.
  • Experiment with different foods, try eliminating different foods from your diet to see if that makes a difference to your symptoms.

Looking to be free of restricted diets? Try IBSACOL today and see if after just a few weeks you can go back to eating the foods you miss. Here are some testimonials from people who have found that IBSACOL helped them.

Thank you to the International Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders for providing information on this topic.

*A healthy diet is vital for everyone. Please remember to always seek medical advice. This article is written generically about IBS and should not supersede any advice received by a medical professional about an individual condition. If you think you have IBS or any other condition get the advice of your Family Doctor especially before beginning or changing any course of medication.

 

 

 


What are IBS symptoms? November 04, 2015 10:00

Irritable Bowel Syndrome is characterised most simply by abdominal pain and changes in the bowel that last for at least 3 days a month for a period of 3 months or more.

Symptoms can vary from person to person but common signs will include:

  • Abdominal pain
  • Gas
  • Feeling of fullness
  • Bloating

Other symptoms that may be experienced are:

  • Appetite loss
  • Mucus in stools
  • Change in consistency or appearance of stools

Although IBS is a gastric condition some symptoms may not be directly linked to the intestines

  • Anxiety or depression
  • Fatigue
  • Headaches
  • An unpleasant taste in the mouth
  • Backache
  • Sleep problems (insomnia)
  • Sexual problems, such as pain during sex or reduced sexual desire
  • Heart palpitations
  • Urinary symptoms (Including frequent or urgent need to urinate, trouble starting the urine stream, or trouble emptying bladder)

Bowels
Bowel changes can present in two very different ways. Some IBS sufferers will experience diarrhoea, others constipation and in some cases a person may experience an alternation between diarrhoea and constipation. Typically pain will be relieved following a bowel movement.

What do you do if you identify with these symptoms?

Firstly it is important to remember that there are many other medical conditions that share these symptoms; that is why if you have the symptoms mentioned above you should seek medical advice. 

If you already have been diagnosed with IBS and are wanting to know more about this condition please check out our other posts or learn more about what IBSACOL can do for you here.

Thanks to the U.S. National Library of Medicine and the Mayo Clinic for information that has contributed to this article.

*Please remember to always seek medical advice. This article is written generically about IBS and should not supersede any advice received by a medical professional about an individual condition. If you think you have IBS or any other condition get the advice of your Family Doctor especially before beginning or changing any course of medication.

 


Some great sites for more information on Irritable Bowel Syndrome September 29, 2015 10:30

Perhaps you just found out about an Irritable Bowel Syndrome diagnosis, or you want to find out more about what IBS means. We always recommend that you seek out your doctor for a diagnosis before anything else.

Once you have seen your doctor and you are looking for good sites with information on Irritable Bowel Syndrome why don't you have a look at these?

www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/irritable-bowel-syndrome/basics/definition/con-20024578

www.nhs.uk/Conditions/Irritable-bowel-syndrome/Pages/Introduction.aspx

www.medicinenet.com/irritable_bowel_syndrome_ibs/article.htm

www.webmd.com/ibs/default.htm

If you are looking for a blog space, a support group, to find out what other people are going through or to share your own story why don't you have a look at IBS group?

www.ibsgroup.org

If you happen to find other sites that were helpful we would love to hear from you. Just get in touch through our contacts page.

*Please be aware:
Although we have read through each of these pages and find them helpful for gathering information about irritable bowel syndrome the views expressed by the creators of these sites and the advertisers on them are their own and are not necessarily shared by the team at Lyproxea. We always recommend that you speak with your doctor before undergoing any radical change to the management of IBS.


How Lyproxea works September 24, 2015 12:28

Look on any blog, forum or self-help website for the relief of IBS or Eczema and you will see huge lists of remedies to relieve symptoms and treat, if not cure, these conditions. One of the most common questions we are faced with is “How do I know this one will work?”

Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Inflammation
Research has now shown that there is a direct relationship between mucosal inflammation of the colon and irritable bowel syndrome (both constipation and diarrhoea). By controlling this inflammation with naturally occurring, esterified, fatty acids that trigger your body to produce normal  anti-inflammatory cytokines, sufferers of IBS – C & D find relief from their symptoms.

Eczema and Inflammation

Eczema occurs where skin becomes so inflamed that it becomes dry, itchy, red and irritated. By acting on the source of the problem users can find relief from these symptoms without the ongoing application of topical creams or steroids.

Lyproxea is produced from dietary fatty acids that are esterified to ensure they are stable and delivered to the right parts of the digestive system. These esterified fatty acids raise the levels of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 in the body enhancing the body’s ability to respond in a healthy way to the triggers for the inflammation.

Want that once more in English? By taking Lyproxea your body is able to increase the presence of a naturally occurring anti-inflammatory response to relieve conditions caused by inflammation, therefore alleviating symptoms without the risks and side-effects associated with steroids or immuno-suppressants.


IBSACOL and IBS-C and IBS-D August 12, 2015 15:00

If you have been wondering how one pill could treat both the constipation and diarrhea symptoms associated with these two different types of IBS then this is for you:

Laxatives and antidiarrheals both work to combat individual symptoms of IBS. Each can be effective in their application, particularly as it helps with painful and often embarrassing symptoms allowing sufferers to do many of the normal activities they feel they otherwise could not.

Where IBSACOL differs is that instead of increasing or decreasing the peristalsis (contractions) in the bowels to help control bowel movements it goes to the source of the problem, increased inflammatory response in the bowel. By boosting the body’s natural response to inflammation (Anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10) the conditions within the bowel remain normal and no constipation or diarrhea is triggered.