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Can I make my eczema better with diet? April 06, 2016 00:00

Well it’s a good question! A healthy diet and good proper nutrition is important to our general wellbeing whether we have eczema or not. Some people report that they have been able to eliminate eczema by significantly changing food choices. So it is definitely worth considering what you eat to find out if certain foods are potential triggers for you.

Food Triggers

Linking the eating of certain foods with eczema symptoms is an individual thing. Common foods that can potentially cause a flare-up are dairy (especially cow’s milk and egg), soy, nuts, wheat and shellfish. These food groups alone cause 90% of all food allergies.
Some of the more acidic fruits – strawberries, tomatoes, oranges and lemons can also set off a skin reaction in eczema sufferers. If you think you may be allergic to a particular food its best to talk to your doctor. Testing may then be recommended to diagnose any specific allergies.

Food additives and preservatives found in pre-packaged and processed food can also trigger or worsen the eczema. Look on the labels for ingredients like tartrazine (E102), sodium benzoate, fruit preservatives and monosodium glutamate (MSG).

Elimination diets

Some people find it beneficial to avoid certain food types to relieve the eczema. Known as an “elimination diet’ or exclusion diet’. This does take some time - it’s a process of finding out what could be the trigger by removing specific foods or ingredients from your diet. Over time you can then start introducing the suspect food to see if there are any changes.

Treating and eating away the eczema!

Choosing a healthy diet with plenty of fruits, vegetables, whole grains and low-fat dairy is certainly the right path. You may also want to include taking Eczacol as an effective and safe supplement.

Avoiding processed food, alcohol, refined carbohydrates and sugars will almost certainly make a difference. Foods high in Omega-3 fatty acids found in fish and fish oil will help fight any inflammation. Vitamins A and B found in green leafy vegetables, carrots, squash and sweet potato’s is also recommended. Make sure you’re well hydrated too by drinking plenty of water, at least 1.5 litres – our bodies need it.

So there you have it – According to many it is very much possible to eat your way out of the eczema symptoms and improve your health and wellbeing at the same time. Win Win!

If you have tried diet changes but are still suffering from the uncomfortable symptoms of eczema why not try ECZACOL, a natural medical supplement that has been shown to relieve symptoms of eczema in just 6 weeks.

*Please remember to always seek medical advice. This article is written generically about eczema and should not supersede any advice received by a medical professional about an individual condition. If you think you have eczema, atopic dermatitis or any other condition get the advice of your Family Doctor especially before beginning or changing any course of medication.


What are IBS trigger foods November 11, 2015 10:00

What is a trigger food?

An Irritable Bowel Syndrome ‘trigger food’ is one that can initiate or aggravate IBS symptoms including change in bowel movements, cramps and bloating. Some of these foods are widely known for their effect on sufferers where others do not always set off a reaction but in some instances do.

What foods are included?

Foods known to produce excess gas within the bowels – these can aggravate bloating and feelings of urgency. 
(Beans, cabbage, legumes, cauliflower, broccoli, lentils, sprouts, raisins, onions, bagels, soft drinks and soda etc.)

Foods that stimulate the gut – these can cause cramping and bloating.
(High fat meals, large portion sizes, fried foods, alcohol and caffeine)

Hard to digest sugars – these can cause cramping and diarrhoea.
(Sorbitol sweetener found in some sugar free food and soft drinks and fructose)

What alternatives are there?

It is important to remember that although these food’s may trigger IBS symptoms if you do decide to remove them from your diet you will still need to find a source of the vital vitamins and minerals your body requires.

  • Consider speaking to a dietician about developing a meal plan tailored to your symptoms.
  • There are many diet plans available online, the majority of them have good ideas on how to eat well with IBS.
  • Experiment with different foods, try eliminating different foods from your diet to see if that makes a difference to your symptoms.

Looking to be free of restricted diets? Try IBSACOL today and see if after just a few weeks you can go back to eating the foods you miss. Here are some testimonials from people who have found that IBSACOL helped them.

Thank you to the International Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders for providing information on this topic.

*A healthy diet is vital for everyone. Please remember to always seek medical advice. This article is written generically about IBS and should not supersede any advice received by a medical professional about an individual condition. If you think you have IBS or any other condition get the advice of your Family Doctor especially before beginning or changing any course of medication.