News

My skin itches is it eczema? August 29, 2016 13:07

So you got the itch and you want to scratch but what can it be? It may just be on a small area or the whole body! Itchy skin, also known as pruritus is an irritating sensation and with a range of probable causes. It can be linked to skin diseases and infection but more commonly its a symptom of atopic dermatitis. There’s a wealth of information out there on the causes and treatments. Here are a few to get you started:

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/311473.php This recent article examines the causes of itchy skin. 

http://www.healthline.com/health/itching Lists 70 possible causes of itching (along with useful photo examples) including allergic eczema, dermatitis, psoriasis and more.   

http://www.dermnetnz.org/topics/itch-pruritus/ Gives a more closer look at some of the systemic disorders, occurrence and treatment for the itch. 

 

As with any medical concern it is best to seek help from your doctor or dermatologist first. Finding the cause of the itching and effective treatment of any underlying condition is the first step and can only be done by a medical practitioner.  If eczema is identified then have a look at our Eczacol product page for safe effective treatment and be on the road to an itch free life. 

 

*Please remember to always seek medical advice. This article is written generically about eczema and should not supersede any advice received by a medical professional about an individual condition. If you think you have eczema, atopic dermatitis or any other condition get the advice of your Family Doctor especially before beginning or changing any course of medication.


Does my baby have Eczema? August 24, 2016 16:40

There’s nothing like snuggling up with you’re beautiful new born or growing baby. Most babies are born with a variety of harmless imperfections (rashes, spots, acne and bumps). Your baby’s skin is a work in progress and goes through a number of changes in the early days and weeks of it’s life.  

Infant eczema is one of the most common baby skin conditions. Usually it appears in the first six months and only lasts up to their 5th birthday. There is not one single cause for eczema. It can be hereditary or a reaction to allergens or environmental irritants such as pollen or smoke.   

The main symptom to look for is:- 

Itchy rashes – usually from the face down through to any part the body. Look at the crooks of your baby’s body (elbows, knees), wrists and ankles. It may look like dry, thickened, scaly skin or tiny red bumps that ooze or look infected when scratched. 

A few things you can do? 

Seek medical advice. You’re family doctor is your first port of call to correctly diagnose eczema and advice on any treatment.  

Regulate your baby’s body temperature. Any rapid changes can dry out the delicate skin. Choose natural soft fabrics like cotton for clothing and bedding.  Dress your baby’s hands with mittens or socks and keep fingernails short.   

Keep baby’s skin moisturised and stay away from any harsh soaps and detergents.  Use mild, fragrance-free for laundry and no chemical fabric softeners. 

Get connected with other parents going through the same thing - it helps to share advice, experience and ideas in managing the condition.   

 And, don't forget: 

Grab plenty of rest where you can. A new baby is a challenging season of life and managing infant eczema on top of that can be exhausting.  Allow family and friends to help whenever they can and make use of any local support groups. 

 

Infant eczema usually clears up into that lovely soft, smooth skin parents adore.  Many children outgrow eczema by the time they turn two. Some by the time they’re adults. If only adult eczema could just disappear in the same way. 

 

*Please remember to always seek medical advice. This article is written generically about eczema and should not supersede any advice received by a medical professional about an individual condition. If you think you have eczema, atopic dermatitis or any other condition get the advice of you Family Doctor especially before beginning or changing any course of medication. 

 


How do I treat eczema on my face? April 20, 2016 00:00

Eczema on your face does pose a beauty challenge. Masking delicate areas with make-up can make the symptoms of eczema worse and potentially draw attention to problem areas. Did you know the skin on your face is the thinnest on the body so it can react more sensitively to any product you use especially around the eyes and mouth area.

No make-up or facial cleansers have a complete answer but there are some great products out there to make you feel very presentably "human again". There’s even some that claim to be so free from chemicals you could eat them. Have a chat with your doctor or dermatologist first before trying any new product, as they may be able recommend what’s best for your individual skin condition.



If you are looking for a way to treat the symptoms of eczema and find freedom for your skin check out ECZACOL today. Taking 2 capsules 3 times a day has been proven to reduce the appearance of eczema symptoms in as little as 6 weeks.

Make-up tips:

Prepare the skin first and foremost with an oil-based moisturiser. Eczema prone skin can feel more like sandpaper than satin so always start with a rich base. The oil content gives a better barrier between your skin and foundation and keeps your skin hydrated for longer. For an easy natural make-up look you may want to stick to a tinted moisturiser.

Avoid any crumbly concealer and blushers that might cake on your skin. Creamier foundations are the way to go for drier skin and can be combined with moisturisers. Do a 24-hour test of make up on a small area of clear skin (perhaps along your jawline) to check for any reaction.

Take care with any eye cosmetic. Try using a gel liner rather than pencil to avoid pulling the delicate skin area.

A couple of ingredients to avoid:

Fragrances – synthetic scents can cause flare-ups. Even items labelled as “unscented” can still contain a fragrance to mask out other chemical odours.

Lanolin – It’s a pore blocking substance and some people have a reaction around the eye area when using lanolin-based make-up.

So if you do use make up: keep it light, select carefully and only wear when you feel it’s necessary. Check out the ingredients that can set off any eczema reaction and when you find the right products for your skin – stick with it.

Oh and always remember to gently clean away any make up before bed and get your skin-replenishing moisturiser on.

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Some recommendations:

Exederm - Is recommended by National Excema Association

World Organic - A personal preference of mine for make-up, moisterisers etc. – world organic! They have a great range of products, and advice on chemicals you might want to avoid.

Clarins - Ideal if you want to buy from the high street or local mall 

Here is a site with some good product and make up tips for eczema sufferers - Get The Gloss

 


Can I make my eczema better with diet? April 06, 2016 00:00

Well it’s a good question! A healthy diet and good proper nutrition is important to our general wellbeing whether we have eczema or not. Some people report that they have been able to eliminate eczema by significantly changing food choices. So it is definitely worth considering what you eat to find out if certain foods are potential triggers for you.

Food Triggers

Linking the eating of certain foods with eczema symptoms is an individual thing. Common foods that can potentially cause a flare-up are dairy (especially cow’s milk and egg), soy, nuts, wheat and shellfish. These food groups alone cause 90% of all food allergies.
Some of the more acidic fruits – strawberries, tomatoes, oranges and lemons can also set off a skin reaction in eczema sufferers. If you think you may be allergic to a particular food its best to talk to your doctor. Testing may then be recommended to diagnose any specific allergies.

Food additives and preservatives found in pre-packaged and processed food can also trigger or worsen the eczema. Look on the labels for ingredients like tartrazine (E102), sodium benzoate, fruit preservatives and monosodium glutamate (MSG).

Elimination diets

Some people find it beneficial to avoid certain food types to relieve the eczema. Known as an “elimination diet’ or exclusion diet’. This does take some time - it’s a process of finding out what could be the trigger by removing specific foods or ingredients from your diet. Over time you can then start introducing the suspect food to see if there are any changes.

Treating and eating away the eczema!

Choosing a healthy diet with plenty of fruits, vegetables, whole grains and low-fat dairy is certainly the right path. You may also want to include taking Eczacol as an effective and safe supplement.

Avoiding processed food, alcohol, refined carbohydrates and sugars will almost certainly make a difference. Foods high in Omega-3 fatty acids found in fish and fish oil will help fight any inflammation. Vitamins A and B found in green leafy vegetables, carrots, squash and sweet potato’s is also recommended. Make sure you’re well hydrated too by drinking plenty of water, at least 1.5 litres – our bodies need it.

So there you have it – According to many it is very much possible to eat your way out of the eczema symptoms and improve your health and wellbeing at the same time. Win Win!

If you have tried diet changes but are still suffering from the uncomfortable symptoms of eczema why not try ECZACOL, a natural medical supplement that has been shown to relieve symptoms of eczema in just 6 weeks.

*Please remember to always seek medical advice. This article is written generically about eczema and should not supersede any advice received by a medical professional about an individual condition. If you think you have eczema, atopic dermatitis or any other condition get the advice of your Family Doctor especially before beginning or changing any course of medication.


How do I treat my dandruff when I have eczema? March 31, 2016 00:00

Are you noticing large slightly greasy white flakes on the dark clothing on your shoulders? Or have you recently tried turning your head upside and brushing your scalp with your fingers over black paper? You may have the common cosmetic problem of dandruff! It’s a harmless, non-contagious condition but can be unpleasant and embarrassing for the sufferer. If you also feel that intense itching and patches of flaky skin, then this is a form of eczema known as seborrheic eczema or seborrheic dermatitis.

Seborrheic dermatitis affects the scalp by targeting a specific fat found in sebum
(oil released in the scalp) known as oleic acid. This loss of sebum leads to the cells on the scalp losing their stickiness and flaking off. Additionally, it can affect the areas of the face and in and around the ears showing some mild pink patches or in some cases thick crusts of skin.

If you are looking for a convenient and effective treatment of seborrheic dermatitis than give Eczacol a go. This oral supplement (no messy creams to make your hair greasy) goes to the source of the problem and is proven to be an effective relief from these symptoms. For more information on Eczacol click here to head to the store.

Some general tips on managing your hair and scalp

  • Only wash your hair only when you need to. If it’s not greasy then leave it another day.
  • Avoid blow drying your hair – if your scalp is particularly irritated then leave it to dry out naturally. Hot air from hairdryers can really dry out your scalp and increase the problem.
  • Use gentle, natural shampoo or if you are prone to excess oil then wash your hair in products specifically formulated to treat dandruff and oily scalps. These pH neutral shampoos help restore your scalps acid-base balance. Shampoo your hair after sweating heavily as perspiration can be a trigger.
  • Stay away from sharp combs and brushes. Yes, the feeling of these brushes can be bliss for an itchy scalp but it does more damage in the long run. Use ones with smooth plastic and wide tines – it’s much kinder to the skin.

Also hats and headbands can make the scalp hot and sweaty and control the use of styling products as this can irritate the scalp on contact.

Dandruff itself usually clears with the correct hair and skin treatment but it can be a recurring problem. So be on the lookout for those flare-ups or pesky flakes re-appearing.

*Please remember to always seek medical advice. This article is written generically about eczema and should not supersede any advice received by a medical professional about an individual condition. If you think you have eczema, atopic dermatitis or any other condition get the advice of your Family Doctor especially before beginning or changing any course of medication.


Do I have eczema? February 29, 2016 12:34

‘This rash won’t go away.’ ‘My skin is very dry and sensitive.’ ‘I can’t stop scratching.’  These are very common complaints from sufferers of eczema, also known as atopic dermatitis.  Eczema can affect anyone, at any time in life, though mostly during infancy.  About 20% of babies have it and 1 in 10 adults have some type of eczema.  Often sufferers will have family members with the same condition or may suffer hay fever, asthma or other allergies.

What does it look like?

If you, or a loved one, have eczema it’s likely your skin will be red, dry and sensitive. Symptoms can range from very mild to severe.  You may suffer from the unpleasant and intense itching causing further inflammation on your skin. Other signs to look out for are:

  • Recurring rash
  • Scaly areas
  • Oozing and crusting of skin
  • Rough leathery patches
  • Dark coloured patches.

Symptoms of eczema are different for each person and can affect any part of your skin. Commonly it’s found in the bends of the elbows and knees, face, buttocks, hands, wrists and feet. But really it can appear anywhere.

Getting help

If you suspect you have this condition it is important to see your medical practitioner straightaway.  They can best diagnose eczema by examining the skin and looking at any family history. They may then refer you to a dermatologist or allergist for confirmation or treatment. If you would like some advice on the many treatments available speak to your local pharmacist about what is available or head to our online store to check out Eczacol and find out if it could help you.

What about my kids?

Signs of eczema in children usually appear as early as nine to twelve months of age, with some as early as 4 months. In babies eczema tends to show up on the cheeks and scalp first.  It may spread to the arms, legs, chest or other parts of the body.  Rash’s also commonly appear on: -

  • Inside of elbows and backs of knees
  • Wrists, and the ankles

Thankfully most children grow out of the condition before school age or adulthood. Remember though only your doctor can diagnose eczema correctly so if you are in any doubt check any unusual skin appearance with them.

 

*Please remember to always seek medical advice. This article is written generically about eczema and should not supersede any advice received by a medical professional about an individual condition. If you think you have eczema, atopic dermatitis or any other condition get the advice of your Family Doctor especially before beginning or changing any course of medication.


How do I spell Eczema? February 23, 2016 16:18

I don’t know about you but whenever I type in an uncommon word I rely on my wonderful computer to know what I’m talking about and do its job auto-correcting my spelling.  In my mind eczema should be spelt xcema or exzma! Other miss-spellings I have come across include eczima, ezema, exama, eximina oh I could go on. As I type I can see those red underlined words shouting at me! Who needs to spell the word correctly anyway when it is enough trouble managing the Simpsons sorry I mean symptoms.

The word eczema (got it right this time) has its origins from the Greek word ekzein.  This dates back all the way to 1753 and literally means “something thrown out by heat” ek – meaning out, zein - meaning boil. A name given from ancient practitioners to “any fiery pustule on the skin.”  To them they are creating a word from the appearance of boiling skin. Sounds lovely eh? So it goes from ekzein to ekzema to eczema (pronounced EK-zeh-ma). 

So how about atopic dermatitis, it sounds a bit more clinical.  Atopy comes from the word allergy and dermatitis meaning skin inflammation. This could seem like another fancy word for dry skin.

If, like me, you were curious about other versions of the same word check out these beautiful translations; perhaps Thai: โรคเรื้อนกวาง or even in hindi खुजली? I think it looks far more impressive or elegant than having the condition feels.

Whatever the spelling or term you give it, if you’re an eczema sufferer have a look at our tried and tested product Eczacol for effective relief from the symptoms of eczema.

 

*Please remember to always seek medical advice. This article is written generically about eczema and should not supersede any advice received by a medical professional about an individual condition. If you think you have eczema, atopic dermatitis or any other condition get the advice of your Family Doctor especially before beginning or changing any course of medication.


What are the symptoms of eczema? December 16, 2015 12:00

Eczema is inflammation of the skin also known as Atopic dermatitis - a very common condition. It comes from the Greek word for bubbling and can be found in children as early 2 or 3 months old though to adults. There are many ways eczema can show itself such as; itching & redness and more severe cases that can cause skin to blister, weep or peel.

Symptoms

Generally people with eczema suffer from dry sensitive skin. Symptoms vary with each case from a mild rash that can disappear quickly, dry skin to red intense itchiness, which can be so bad that you scratch your skin until it bleeds. This of course makes the rash worse - known as the itch-scratch cycle or as medical professionals call it “the itch that rashes”

Itching – one of the most unpleasant things! - The urge to scratch, which causes more rawness and sometimes infections to the skin. The medical term for this is Pruritus (proo-RYE-tuss) these are itching sensations carried by peripheral sensory nerves. You can find more information on this from WebMD here Itching can feel worse at night and can be especially upsetting for children who suffer. Anything that dry’s the skin out can lead to this irritation.

Rashes – inflamed skin usually appears after scratching and can look red and bumpy. On children this commonly appears in the creases of the elbows or knees. Other places are neck, wrists, ankles and/or between the buttocks and legs. With adults the rash can be located just about anywhere.

Unusual skin appearance - Skin can develop a grainy look caused by tiny fluid blisters just under the skin called “vesicles”. Crusts or scabs can form when the fluid of the skin dries out. Lots of rubbing and overuse of steroid creams can produce leathery thicker plaques of skin.

If you are looking for effective relief from these symptoms try ECZACOL today and in as little as 6 weeks you can experience a dramatic reduction in these symptoms. Head to our online store to order now.

*Please remember to always seek medical advice. This article is written generically about eczema and should not supersede any advice received by a medical professional about an individual condition. If you think you have eczema, atopic dermatitis or any other condition get the advice of your Family Doctor especially before beginning or changing any course of medication.

 


Why does my eczema get worse in winter? December 08, 2015 16:44

Don’t you just love winter! It’s the season for warm clothing, roaring fires/heat pumps, comfort food and unfortunately for some people the return of dry itchy skin. If you suffer from eczema it is likely you associate the change in weather with having a harder time with scratching and rashes.

What causes it?

During wintertime the outside air is typically cold and dry and we usually try to keep our homes warm and cosy, did you know that the harsh temperature changes from outside icy winds to the shock of indoor instant heat on your skin can draw away valuable moisture from your skin. Dry skin is more likely to itch and crack making the eczema worse.

Along with the cold drying out your skin other changes in what you wear and activities you take part in can also affect the winter eczema sufferers. Thankfully though, some simple daily changes can help you in preventing skin flare-ups.

So what can help?

Treatment - There are many creams and corticosteroids out there that you can try to keep on top of your symptoms. If you are looking for a capsule that is safe for adults and children that can help you check out ECZACOL here.

Moisturising – continue regularly applying moisturising cream especially after bathing to lock in the moisture back into your skin.

Clothing choice – obviously you want to keep your skin warm but don’t overdress. Sweaty skin can trigger flare-ups. Layering your clothes is a great way to regulate your warmth. Stay away from those woolly knits and always choose soft fabrics. Make sure you take off any wet gloves, socks, hats or other clothing. As always with eczema make sure you avoid washing clothes in harsh detergents and keep your clothes away from dyes and perfumes. Also make sure any softeners you use are chemical free.

Keeping the air normal - Consider using a humidifier – keeping the humidity between 45 and 55% prevents your skin from drying out. You want your indoor environment not too warm or cold.

Sunscreen – Continue to protect your skin from the suns UV rays through winter. Use at least 30 SPF and remember to check the label for ingredients your skin may be sensitive to.

Smoke – being near a fireplace with wood smoke is quickly going to dry out the skin so stay away. Cigarette smoke also can worsen eczema symptoms – a great reason to give up if you are a smoker.

Extra vitamin D – less sunlight means less vitamin D. This is essential for your immune system and a lack of it can make your eczema worse if you’re feeling ill or rundown.

Food choice – Acidic foods such as some dairy, oats and meats have been linked to eczema flare ups by Ragnar Berg (Nobel-prize winner back in the 1930’s). Not great news for the winter porridge fans. Instead try to include the good fats in your diet such as nuts, seeds, fish oil and dark green veggies.

Allergens – if you know what triggers the skin to itch and flare-up continue to avoid them. Perhaps consider if certain plants, fabrics or animal hair has an effect on your eczema?

This winter give your skin some extra bit of care. Don’t let it stop you going out and enjoying the winter fun. Paying attention to the changes in the winter environment and avoiding the triggers will make it easier to cope through the chilly season.

*Please remember to always seek medical advice. This article is written generically about eczema and should not supersede any advice received by a medical professional about an individual condition. If you think you have eczema, atopic dermatitis or any other condition get the advice of your Family Doctor especially before beginning or changing any course of medication. For more information about how ECZACOL could help you head to www.lyproxea.com/eczacol

How Lyproxea works September 24, 2015 12:28

Look on any blog, forum or self-help website for the relief of IBS or Eczema and you will see huge lists of remedies to relieve symptoms and treat, if not cure, these conditions. One of the most common questions we are faced with is “How do I know this one will work?”

Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Inflammation
Research has now shown that there is a direct relationship between mucosal inflammation of the colon and irritable bowel syndrome (both constipation and diarrhoea). By controlling this inflammation with naturally occurring, esterified, fatty acids that trigger your body to produce normal  anti-inflammatory cytokines, sufferers of IBS – C & D find relief from their symptoms.

Eczema and Inflammation

Eczema occurs where skin becomes so inflamed that it becomes dry, itchy, red and irritated. By acting on the source of the problem users can find relief from these symptoms without the ongoing application of topical creams or steroids.

Lyproxea is produced from dietary fatty acids that are esterified to ensure they are stable and delivered to the right parts of the digestive system. These esterified fatty acids raise the levels of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 in the body enhancing the body’s ability to respond in a healthy way to the triggers for the inflammation.

Want that once more in English? By taking Lyproxea your body is able to increase the presence of a naturally occurring anti-inflammatory response to relieve conditions caused by inflammation, therefore alleviating symptoms without the risks and side-effects associated with steroids or immuno-suppressants.